Select Page

Justin Stoddart
I’m your host Justin Stoddart and I’m fortunate today to have with me someone who I admire in business in life, he’s become a very dear friend of mine. Before I introduce him, let me just remind you the purpose of this show, is to help you think bigger. As you do everything else follows suit. If you look at any of the great masterminds, any of the great leaders of all time, they say, it always begins with your thoughts. Thoughts are things. The purpose of this show is to is to hit that first domino so that you end up having a life of great, great impact. Today’s show is going to be a really special one, as I mentioned that this is an individual who inspires me both in business and he’s become a very dear friend of mine. His name is Patrick Woods. Patrick, before I give you the full before I give people the full bio on you, I want to thank you for taking time out of your very busy schedule to come be with us today.

Patrick Woods
Yes, we’ve been trying to do this for a little while now.

Justin Stoddart
Yeah, yeah, you’re, you know, you’re doing some really impressive things. For those that don’t know you. And I know there’s a big part of my audience that does and loves you as well. But you’re your owner of the Patrick Woods Real Estate Group, out of Sacramento area, for those that aren’t familiar with the kind of small areas outside of Sacramento. He’s a KW maps coach and coaches about 20 people at any given time. Really over the course of your career, we discovered that you’ve logged between 5000 and 6000 coaching calls, which is amazing. Yeah, yeah. You’re owner of a KW franchise. Is it Elk Grove that you own? Is that right?

Patrick Woods
Yes, it’s the Elk Grove market center. We have about 170 Associates, and I’ve owned it for a little over two years now.

Justin Stoddart
Awesome, man. So, so cool. And then you travel, speak, teach and train all around the country. And most importantly, which should have been at the top of the list, you’re an amazing husband and father and proud dog owner I should say.

Patrick Woods
Well ask my wife is she says amazing, but yes, I am a husband.

Justin Stoddart
Depends on the day, right? Sometimes we get the amazing vote. Sometimes it’s

Patrick Woods
…the opposite. You just never know. I definitely do my best. So

Justin Stoddart
Well, I’m really excited to get into this topic because how long ago was it that you decided that you were going to run the Boston Marathon?

Unknown Speaker
It’s actually the Boston Marathon.

Justin Stoddart
Oh, it’s Boston. I’ve been I’ve been calling it New York. Okay, so Boston Marathon.

Unknown Speaker
Yeah. Boston Marathon. Yeah. Jenny Wolek, who you had on last week? Right? Yeah, yeah, she’s doing the New York Marathon, I believe.

Justin Stoddart
Okay, that’s where I got it in my head.

Patrick Woods
Absolutely. So sorry. No, so it’s funny. I went on this vacation a little over a year ago. And it was one of those kind of bucket list vacations and we were sounds It sounds so pretentious when I say it. We were literally on a yacht in the Mediterranean, and it was somebody else’s birthday and they said, Hey, you pay for the airfare will take care of the rest. And we’re like, yeah, we’re in Italy. And I was like, This is amazing. And then I started seeing pictures of myself while I was on this trip. Out on the top of a yacht in the hot tub, all this kind of stuff and I see pictures myself. I go, I look like that. That was kind of the moment where I said something needs to change. And I’m like you, I think a lot of us had moments like that where it’s like, okay, it’s, it’s gotten to a point where drastic measures are needed. And so actually, while I was on the yacht, I text message Chris Voght, who’s actually now our team leader in Elk Grove Market Center, and he’s done the Boston Marathon, probably somewhere between 12 and 13 times. He’s done Ironman competitions, all this kind of stuff and he coaches a lot of people. So I text him on on the boat and I said, Man, I need help with you, coach. And so essentially, that’s what’s happening is he’s coaching me, and we go out and grab lunch. You go, so what’s the game plan? What’s the game plan with this whole running thing? I said, Well, I need to get in better shape. So So okay, what if there was a bucket list type thing? Well, if there was a bucket list type thing it would be to run the Boston Marathon, which is just insane because I know you have to qualify and all this kind of stuff. And that’s kind of how it happened. And so there’s way more to it. But that’s kind of long. The short it was it was purely just how do I get in better shape. And if I were to really dive into this running thing, what would be kind of bucket list piece and that was where Boston came in.

Justin Stoddart
And it’s interesting that you guys had that aha, probably a week ago. And I think it’s interesting when we get the outside perspective, whether it be through the help of a camera, whether the help of a loved one I realized like, I thought it looked very different than when I look in the mirror, I see something very different. Then you see pictures. It’s like that’s, that’s not me. And I think you’ve done a lot of training with Tony Robbins and realize that our standards are what we’re willing to put up with. Right? And when you see yourself either via camera or you just have some situation in life that makes you realize like, hey, that’s, I’m not living in accordance with my standards. That’s not how I see myself and I’m aware that now, I look different, or I feel different, or I’m acting different. Then, then the person who I know I’m meant to be who I am in my best self. So just recently, I actually gave up two days ago, three days ago, all sugar and all bread, which are my two favorite things. So I can, like relate a little bit of having this experience of like, that’s not me, and I need to make a drastic change here. So let’s continue on here with your story. So you decided you’re gonna run it, you’ve got a coach, which is also very telling, because even coaches need coaches, right?

Patrick Woods
Yeah. So I got him as a coach, and I got a nutritional coach that helps me my diet and all that fun stuff. And there’s so many things that you learned during this process. So originally, when I signed up for this, the goal was to run a half marathon, my second half marathon. And kind of the the whole thought process was I’d love to get to a place where I could run a half marathon, the way that most people would approach a five or 10 k versus a Hey, it’s tomorrow. Let’s go do it. And so that was kind of where I wanted to get from a fitness standpoint. And yes, you literally I was on that, that trip along with… Wow, you’re looking pretty thick. And I thought he was talking about my guns and he was more talking about my tummy. So I realized that after the fact.

Justin Stoddart
So, you have this coach now and you’re moving towards your goal, keep going.

Patrick Woods
So, I started running and then we start out with, okay, just jog, walk two miles. I was like, come on, I can do better than that. And of course, I go out and I start running and like, maybe I do need to jog, walk two miles just to get going. And next thing you know, he’s got me trained up or I’m running eight miles just as one of my long runs and all this kind of stuff. And in that process actually end up getting shin splints really bad and to the point where I got stress fractures and I had to take six weeks off right before the half marathon. And so the doctor said, you gotta take six weeks off, you know, running maybe three weeks into you can start doing elliptical, which of course I did not do. And so I just enjoyed not running for a little while. And then a week before I get cleared to run, and I text my coach, I said, Hey, do you think I could still do this half marathon? And my goal was to do the half marathon less than two hours. I’d done one before. And it was two and a half hours. And so I texted me, hey, do you think I could do this? Question is, if you can, it’s if you should. So why don’t I go run and see if I can run a miles if I could run eight miles without any pain or anything like that, then I’ll do the half marathon. Long story short, I ran eight miles, no pain, I did half marathon. My goal was to get less than two hours. And I finished with two hours in two minutes after taking six weeks off. Right. So and I left that one going. This is really fun. This is really cool. Of course, the endorphin high and all that fun stuff. And I just go Okay, what else? What else? What else can I sign up for? So I signed up for California international marathon. And with that came a discount to the urban cow which is in Sacramento, which is a half marathon. So I started mapping this whole thing out for me to do see I am a December And the half marathon last month would have been just kind of like a little stop along the way. And the goal for the half marathon was to do it an hour 45 and then went to Austin, and I was one of the lucky ones that hopped on with those scooters. And I wasn’t even an evil Knievel. I say it was Duke Kaboom. I don’t know if you seen Toy Story Four. He’s the Canadian version of Evil Knievel that doesn’t make it any of his jumps. Yeah, so I went over the handlebars.

Patrick Woods
I was literally going from a meeting to go facilitate a mastermind. And I was riding on the scooters. And this is so funny. I bumped into a guy buddy of mine named Tony Brody. I bumped into him on the corner and he goes, man, be careful on those things, everybody’s getting hurt. Like I’m fine. Kid, you not, a half block later, I hit something in the sidewalk, went over the handlebars, landed on my arms like this, and then my chin hit. And actually now I’m coming to there’s somebody standing next to me that’s called an ambulance. The whole deal, I get up. Of course, the first thing I’m worried about is turning off my scooter so I don’t get charged anymore. And everyone else is freaking out and like there’s an ambulance on the way a little thing. I talked the ambulance out of coming. I checked my arms. I go, they’re sore, but I think I’m fine. Just a little kind of out of it. I go and teach a mastermind to about 30 people. I have later I find out how to broken arms and a concussion. So yeah, we went to dinner that night. I was like you know what, it’s sore, it’s fine, if it still hurts like this tomorrow, I’ll go to the hospital no big deal. At dinner, my arms are locking up to the point where I have to have my friend actually cut my food for me. Because I couldn’t get both my fork and a knife up there At that point I said yeah, maybe I should go the hospital. So long story short, broken arms concussion. And I had to take about six seven weeks off of running again, essentially right before the half marathon

Justin Stoddart
Hold on here for a sec. Total plot twist, right. Not only was it going to be a stretch to…

Patrick Woods
One of my finer moments, by the way.

Justin Stoddart
I mean, not only was it going to be a stretch to do like the marathon and hit the times that you wanted, and then to qualify for Boston, which is a bucket list, but now you find yourself broken arms, and six to seven weeks off. Anybody that’s trained for a marathon knows like, every week is critical, right? There’s this build up, and you take a six or seven week window out of there and in your head, you must have thought I keep like, I’m changing the goal, right?

Patrick Woods
Well, yes and no. So I was supposed to do a Spartan in Tahoe, right after that. It was a Spartan beast, and that was 13.1 miles, of course. And always I deferred that till next year because with have broken arms. Spartans are just running. It’s a lot of course working so that’d be the only one there. I said, Okay. We’re going to push that one out. And the half marathon, I just said, you know what, I gotta take some time off. And I’m still going to run it. Where I shifted a little bit was, can I hit the hour and 45 minute mark. So that’s probably the only thing I changed. I did nothing as far as the half marathon of actually doing it, or the California International Marathon in December changed. So that was always that was going to stay. And so, about two weeks before the half marathon, I started training again and went out and we did the did that marathon. I didn’t get an hour 45 I got an hour and 58 so I essentially got my goal from last year or the beginning of March this year of what I wanted sub 2-hour I got that on this one. So we’re doing some training. Yeah, well and more and more leading up to that and the hard part was is just you work so hard on some of these things like the diet and exercise all that and then you have something like that, that set you back. And then next you know you’re not exercising. I still can’t do a lot of stuff with my arms, I can’t do all the only thing I really can’t do is running or elliptical or cycling or stuff like that. I can’t do anything with my upper body really. But you start making choices. Really, you know what I’m kind of in a funk, I think I might have a cheeseburger for lunch. And so you gradually start watching all that work go away. And then you hit that same point where it’s like, Good grief, I’ve worked for about a year now, to get to where I was right before I broke my arm. So I’m not going to give it up that fast. And say, jump right back on the horse pretty quickly.

Justin Stoddart
So winners do, right? I think, you know, the human tendency is to if there’s an easier way, if there’s a way out, by default, we tend to be like, you know, you’re right, this has been really hard and I really tried, but now I’ve got broken arms, right. So let’s compare this to business. How have you seen the show up the business, Patrick, you’ve got people who set big goals, they’re moving along towards their goal, they’re even that like surprising themselves and all of a sudden adversity hits, what is the tendency that most people do that maybe relates to what you could have done.

Patrick Woods
Oh, yeah. And what most people do, including myself, right. And that’s, that’s kind of in the most interesting thing. I’m still sitting here going do I even really like running? I don’t know. sounds kind of weird as I’m doing all this. What I love about it is the mental aspect of it. Because there’s so many lessons to be learned from this journey that I can apply to so many other things. And I think we’re a lot of people that hit with adversity is they don’t have something, they don’t have a finish line. And that’s the thing that I’ve noticed with this running is if I was if I didn’t have the half marathon or the full marathon as my finish line. I would have every excuse in the morning to say, you know what, it’s cold outside. I waited now it’s too hot. You know what, I worked really hard yesterday deserve a break. When you have that finish line, I’ve got a half marathon to run. I’ve got a full marathon. I’ve gotta run I started playing this devil’s advocate my head going, you know what, if I don’t train, I’m going to be a fool. On that run, I’m not going to look very good, I’m not gonna feel very good. I’m gonna wish I’d never signed up for it. So that’s kind of the negative self talk that I used to empower myself to get up when I don’t feel like it can go running anyways. And so that’s where I look at it. There’s a couple things one, progress, not perfection, and then trust the process. And my coach will tell me, run slower, run slower, run slower, which seems counterintuitive. And lo and behold, when I’m running slower, and he take me further distances he throws and other training programs in there, and actually, you know, I’m running a faster mile pace. So he’s got a method to his madness. I have to trust the process, even though it seems counterintuitive. The other thing is, most people when they get hit with adversity, they don’t have a finish line that they’re shooting for. They have a thought or an idea or a dream, but they haven’t actually, like with a marathon, you put pen to paper, you put your credit card down, you tell your friends, I’m running marathon on December eight, and the world knows you’re kind of stuck in making sure you do that. And so that’s where I think a lot of people will fail is they just don’t have that that finish line in their business and their, in their relationships, whatever it is that they’re shooting for. They’ve got a goal, a dream, a wish, they don’t have a finish line.

Justin Stoddart
That stood out for me, I was out on a morning run, and I like one of the workouts that I do is I’ll run a mile and a half, and pretty good clip, and then I’ll try and beat my time back. So obviously more tired. For me, it’s a little bit of an incline coming back, like, and I’ll try and beat that coming back. Remember, at one point, one morning, I was like, I’m not gonna make it, .like I just need to stop and walk. I’m behind pace, I’m not gonna make it and the tendency was like, I have to beat this or I stop. I’m done. Like, I’m not gonna do it at all. I had to tell myself what you’re telling yourself there is just trust the process. Just keep going. Just keep going. Keep going and when that happens, I did end up beating my time back. And, again, that negative self talk oftentimes steps in is it’s it’s perfection or nothing. Like, if you can’t do it perfectly, then you shouldn’t do it at all. And the reality is none of us can do it perfectly. Right, especially at first. And so it’s this, it’s this lie that tells us that keeps us from actually doing the work that will eventually lead us to perfection.

Patrick Woods
Absolutely. When as you’re saying that I think about just some of the little things that happen on this journey where you start running, cash, my knees a little tight, my ankles a little tight, and then you keep going, and it all loosens up, right? And so that’s the same thing in business. And in life, you’re going to have instances where it’s things are going to start to work against you and cause your brain to go, maybe I should stop. However, if you just keep pushing through, it will start to loosen up, you’ll hit your stride. And what’s funny, one of the worst runs that I’ve had in all this training is two weeks ago, I ran 14 miles and it was miserable. It was the only thing I can say that I’m happy about is that I finished 14 miles on my feet. And what’s funny as last weekend I ran 16 and my 14th mile was my fastest mile out of the whole run. And then yesterday I ran 17 miles, my 17th mile was my fastest mile out of the whole run. And it’s funny not funny is in Sacramento and Northern California, we had the wind which is why all the power outages and all that stuff. I kid you not I ran 17 miles into the wind the whole way, no matter which way it turned, the wind would change and I was running into a headwind the whole way. It was it was an interesting day. So you start looking at you go, okay, where can I really power through like you’re on your return? Where can I power through and once I have loosen up and hit my stride, all of a sudden you’re going to be in the zone. And then what’s your motivation when everything in your body saying Okay, I gotta quit, I gotta stop, I gotta walk. What’s your motivation is going to cause you to keep from walking. Same thing in business, anything anything else in life is the games that we play. I’m sure you’ve done it when you’re going out on a run a lot of people have where they’re going on a run. It’s like, okay, just need to make it to that stop sign. You make it to the stop sign. Hey, what if I can make it that fire hydrant? Make it to the fire hydrant. Okay, what have you the next stop sign? And it’s no different with anything else because our brains telling us we want to quit. And you know, we get to the stopsign and it’s like, wow I still have a little bit left in the tank. I remember this when I ran this last half marathon, my son’s old soccer coach, my wife was there and she was like, Oh my gosh, Kelly Sebarus beat you by like 20 seconds it was so crazy. It was her name then your name. So like, man, if I knew she was there, I would have tried a little bit harder. My coach got mad at me. He’s like, Oh, you had extra in the tank, huh. Yeah, you’re probably right. So what’s our, what’s our motivation? I’m competitive, I like to win. And so, I mean, this is when we’re kind of going all over the place. The thing that’s happened now is the goal is to run the bucket list was run the Boston Marathon and because of some of these injuries, and frankly just starting out and running, there’s I didn’t have enough runway to get to where I could be at a pace for qualifying time to run in 2020. And so my coach connected me with the Leukemia Lymphoma Society, and they get out of thousands of people that run the Boston Marathon. I mean, my age group qualifying time is I think it was three hours and five minutes. So you’re talking like a seven minute mile for 26.2 miles. And I’m going wow, some of my faster times are like eight minutes and 30 seconds, so I’ve got quite a bit of room to improve. So I didn’t have a runway so I connected with him. I coach connected me with them. And out of all those bibs that they have Leukemia, Lymphoma Society gets 35 bibs, and probably 15-20 go to Boston chapters of LLS and I was able to get one of those out here in Sacramento. So that’s how I’m running the Boston Marathon. And so even yesterday as I was running, you know, like, man, this is really tough. I started thinking about my wife’s grandmother Jackie, who our sons named after and she passed away from Leukemia. And so you start, you start looking at ways that you can motivate yourself, just to push through even when things are a little tough. And then you know what, I got home and were my leg sore, yeah, and we still hang out in carved pumpkins, and that kind of stuff. I didn’t leave it all out on the field. I wasn’t dead when I got home. Right? There was more to give, I just had to come up with something that gets some sort of mantra or thought or belief to power through even when my mind was saying, you know what, you made it 16 you could walk a little bit right now.

Justin Stoddart
If all of a sudden, someone that we loved were in jeopardy, we’d find a, like an entirely new tank of gas that we would tap into. You and I have both read the book Can’t Hurt Me by David Goggins and which he talks about when people think that they’re done, they’re actually at 40%. I was thinking about that, and I’m like, I can’t do any more. I got more than half still left my tank, it’s my mindset that stopping me. Again, back to the whole purpose of the show think bigger is that once you start to be around people like you, Patrick, and your experience and you’re around other people that inspire you, is that we start to realize, like, oh, what I thought were my limits aren’t actually my limits and we start to actually expand that thinking a little bit around, possibilities start to expand, we start to realize, like, you know, I can do more, I don’t have to settle for saying this goal was was too lofty, or I can’t do this, or this isn’t for me, or it’s not working for me, or, you know, nobody knew that these extenuating circumstances were going to happen. But instead, we can find another way around it as you have.

Patrick Woods
As you’re saying that also thinking about is, there was a moment in time when I used to say, Gosh, running 26.2 miles, that’s impossible. And what’s funny is now them doing these runs, I go out and I go, Okay, I gotta run 17 miles a day, this next weekend after 18, or I get to run 18 right and you start going, huh, 26.2 is actually possible, and it feels like I could actually do it. So you go from that’s impossible, I could never do it and you start working the system and and all of a sudden your mindset starts changing where it goes, it’s not impossible, it might actually be possible to where, then you go, Wow, I definitely could do this. I don’t know what my time will be but I can definitely do this. Then you get to a point where I say, I finished one, what can I do to get better? So I’m sure there’s people out there that do Ironman and all that and they laugh at my 17 miles and then there’s people like me a year ago that were are you kidding me? You’re going to go run 17 miles, I call it fun.

Justin Stoddart
I am even inspired by our friend. I can’t member his name right now, but he just broke the two hour marathon barrier, right? Like, I think about that when I’m out running and I’m like, this hurts and I’m like, you know, I’ll be fine. I’ll be just fine. Let’s talk really quick. Patrick, you have a class that you teach and speak around the country, it’s called You Fueled. Give us a couple highlights of that, Just so people here within my audience are aware of what you’re teaching and can get access to it, hopefully in the very near future.

Patrick Woods
Yeah, absolutely, so I teach a handful I travel around the country and I’ve been to places I don’t think I ever would have gone to had it not been for the opportunity to teach this class. So I teach you if you have another class, One Secret Skill Every Billionaire Masters and also teach other Keller Williams courses. So You Fueled, what that is, is essentially what I what I see happen in business and in real estate, in particular, because that’s the world that I live in, is people will go to a class, “Here’s how you take 10 listings a month for life.” Right? And they go to that and they leave all excited about how to take 10 listings a month for life. And then how many of those people you think that attend that class actually take 10 listings a month for life?

Justin Stoddart
Maybe one, maybe two

Unknown Speaker
Not even that right? And so there’s a there’s a problem there and they went and they got inspired and they got entertained. They got some education. They got some some processes and models. However, there is something missing here that will cause them to take action. And so my class the You Fueled class actually addresses: Tell me why you got into real estate and begin with what were your goals, dreams and aspirations. Because people don’t shift into real estate with hope they can make money. I want to be my own boss, I want the unlimited income opportunity, I want to create wealth and want to be in control of my schedule. They come in with some pretty big and specific goals and then somewhere along the way, they lose sight of that and they get caught up in the task of doing the business. Right. And then also, what was your exit strategy? What was your end game for? Because I don’t think anybody in real estate wants to be 87 years old or 102 still writing contracts. Right? There’s this other piece of it where they watch the shows like Fixer Upper, Flip or Flop and they go, hey, I can make all this money and I have all this time and all this knowledge so I can actually create wealth. In fact when I got it was Carlton Sheets, How to Buy Real Estate with No Money Down. I had his audio cassette tape program,

Justin Stoddart
I bought them to Yep.

Unknown Speaker
So that that kind of thing, and so I want to get people back in line with why they got into real estate and what’s the end goal on their exit strategy. When we can connect those two pieces, that’s where I think those classes like, which are great classes, Here’s How You Take 10 Listings a Month, it gives a why behind it. Right to align to their goals not just because it’d be cool to do it. So that that’s essentially what You Fueled is about is about getting back connected to here, what caused you to take a leap of faith on yourself to get into something like real estate, which can be pretty scary a pretty intense and quite a big risk was you hadn’t specific goals and you had an exit strategy to dream for your future, so let’s get back in line with that.

Justin Stoddart
And this really ties in nicely with with your story, right is that you had a bucket item list, to run the Boston Marathon, and you’ll learn different tactics and different things on how to run faster obviously adversity hit but in addition to that, it doesn’t matter, even though you know in your head how to run even though you know, you’re even like committed in your heart to the tactics, if you don’t remember Oh that’s right. I’m doing this because I didn’t like the way I was showing up in the world I was out of shape. I set this bucket item list to run the Boston Marathon unless you keep that present your mind, at any point during those 17 miles when you’re training and the 26.2 miles you’d be like why am I doing this?

Unknown Speaker
It’s pretty fascinating when you start looking at it. What’s interesting is when I first partnered with LLS I’m going to be completely honest, it was a path to get a bid to run in Boston in 2020. Right and my wife was like, do you feel like that’s okay all as we had this whole conversation and what’s been interesting because here’s here’s the deal is LLS is happy to do it, if I can raise the funds for LLS, it’s a win win, right? And what it shifted from was here’s a path for me to run Boston Marathon to over the last handful of weeks and say it accepted me. It’s quite a humbling experience to have somebody say, we believe in your influence and your ability to connect with people to help us raise money for such a worthy cause. And by the way, you get to run Boston as part of that. And it’s shifted to Wow, what an honor to be able to do something for such a great charity and running the Boston Marathon is secondary. That’s a vehicle to raise the money, not LLS is a vehicle to run Boston, because it may sound

Justin Stoddart
Yeah, yeah, you’re WHY gotta let deeper rather than just I want to be in shape. I want to look better when I’m on my next yacht in the Mediterranean.

Patrick Woods
I don’t know that that’s going to happen. that might have been a one and done thing…

Justin Stoddart
Hey, you’d be invited to my birthday. Let’s just that’s where I’ll have my 50th it’ll be about 10 years from now, give me some time, maybe 45th. But anyway, that Yeah, you you you deepen your why along the way, right. It wasn’t just about you some of these superficial so I can take a look super good. Not to say that’s superficial, it’s about being healthy, healthy for your family, but at the same time it’s like this is a cause that even someone that we’re related to passed away from… I love that I think there’s there’s deep lessons in that is that if our why is not sustaining us through the difficult times maybe our why isn’t deep enough? Maybe it’s not something that really moves us and moves the world.

Unknown Speaker
Well how cool is it to have something that is affecting change here, you know physically, spiritually all that kind of stuff that’s making an impact out here. Yeah, it’s really cool as you start when I was I remember I’m going to do just kind of a little plug for LLS, when I when I remember when I was filling out the application, and this you put in your plan on how you’re going to raise money and all that kind of stuff and you need to tell a little bit a story about how cancer is impacted your family or your world. I start going through my my wife’s grandmother Jackie, my grandfather’s all passed away from cancer. My father in law passed away from cancer, my dad is currently fighting cancer he has carcinoma cancer, which is more or less incurable, just time ne ne be testicular cancer. And then you that’s just right in that little bubble and then you start going further out when you start including friends and co workers. Like, that list gets really long, really fast when you start thinking of everybody who’s been impacted by cancer. And so that was where it really hit home with me. And so that’s that’s what started that journey to be like, Oh, my gosh, this is much bigger than just running the Boston Marathon. This is much bigger than just getting in shape. And yeah, getting in shape around the Boston Marathon are pretty awesome byproducts of doing something really incredible. So

Justin Stoddart
that’s super powerful. Thank you for sharing that. It would you do us a favor? Would you send me Patrick, the link to donate, we’ll put it in the show notes. So invite anybody that’s watching this. If you’ve been affected by cancer, then we would encourage you to step up and donate and I think it’d be good opportunity for all of us to put our money where our heart is.

Patrick Woods
The websites just PWruns.com. He’s we’re hitting close to the end of the year so it’s a tax deductible donation to so love all the excuses you need to make a good, good impact.

Justin Stoddart
Awesome and I love it I’m going to ask. I’m going to now jump to the signature question of the show. It’s the final one. We love that all of our guests because you’re a big thinker, hence the TB here behind me Think Bigger Real Estate Show. I want to tap into your brain a little bit. You are a guy that continues to expand your own possibilities. You’re a guy that continues to find ways to think bigger. Will you teach us, what are some things, or a thing that you do to continue to encourage that process to continue to not get stuck where you’re at but to continue to expand your own thinking, expand your own thinking?

Patrick Woods
Oh, gosh, I mean, yeah, the basics, which is you got to make sure that you’re surrounding yourself with people that are thinking bigger than you are. I mean, a lot of things you’ve probably heard before. It’s it’s really easy for, for us to say that there’s a lot of really smart people out there that will tell you got to go change the circle that you hang with, and they are still hanging around the same circle, or you need to do this. Here’s what I have observed, in all the classes I teach and all the things that we got going on, we have business planning clinic going on in our office right now, so teaching agents how to set up their 2020 goals and map it out and do the math and all that kind of stuff, I guarantee you there’s gonna be some people in that class are playing all out. And when there’s exercises doing the class, they’re actually doing the exercises, there’s going to be another group of people that were assigned to do exercises, they’re going to get on their phone, or they’re going to step out and use the bathroom, but they’re just avoiding doing exercises. And so the thing that I would say would cause you to think bigger is when you actually take pen to paper when you’re in a class like that, that time, because you’ve already blocked out the time, odds are if you don’t do it in that class, you’re going to leave and you’re never going to do it. So take the time to put pen to paper. And then here’s the other thing that I love, we did this in one of the classes I was in, was you essentially map out your vision for your future. And then you hand it to somebody that you really respect and admire and have them challenge you on are you playing big enough or not? What about this, what about this and you you have to fight for your limitations. So we did that, it was like man, we should do that once a quarter. So for me, I’ve got a whole vision map of all the businesses and all that stuff on a business level, that’s why I’m always looking at and so not to be too long winded here.

Patrick Woods
I remember, do you have two seconds for me to share a story,… we have. So I made this vision map. So I have my my Woods Management which is my kind of holding company for all these for my market center of my real estate team and all this stuff. And on there, I have my Maps Coaching and I had some other lace up business, ancillary businesses for the market center and up here I have Keller Williams ownership. And so I put on there, the market centers that I would like to own or that I already had ownership in. And then on there I said, well, what’s bigger than owning a market center? Well having ownership in a region and I’m in this class and it was bigger than having ownership in a region. If the whole class is about thinking bigger, where am I scared to go on here? And so I wrote in own a country, own a franchise country for Keller Williams. Now here’s the crazy part of it every time I’ve done something really crazy and scary like that and I could give you example, after example, after example, when a pen to paper or something like that. I kid you not two weeks later, I had a friend of mine reach out to me and said, Hey, we’re going to launch a country for Keller Williams, would you like to invest? I don’t know how it all came to be. It was just weird that I was freaked out that I was putting and on this, and then it came to fruition, I didn’t end up investing in it, it was just wasn’t the right timing for me. However, the opportunity was there. So maybe just putting the pen to paper caused me to be aware of the opportunity to engage in conversation that wouldn’t have had otherwise. Don’t know. So those are some of the things I do. And hopefully that helps

Justin Stoddart
Dude, I love it as super, super powerful. I think something some things that we can all take away today. Actually, there’s there’s countless things, everything from overcoming adversity, deepening our why, and how to think bigger. So Patrick, I want to thank you so much for being such a valuable contributor to the think bigger real estate mission, again, is to assemble a tribe of big thinkers, people who want to continue to expand their possibilities and live lives of great, great impact. I’m going to finish with these final three words that the audience is used to hearing me say which is a charge and an invitation all of us which are GO THINK BIGGER. Thank you, Patrick, for your time today it’s been a total pleasure, man as always appreciate that.

Patrick Woods
All right, my friend, talk to you soon. Thank you

Resources

Inspiring real estate industry professionals to THINK BIGGER so that their income, their freedom and their impact for good can also grow.  

Follow Us

We help real estate agents grow themselves so that their businesses can follow suit, thereby giving them a better life, one with more options and greater impact.

Resources

Follow Us

The Upstream Model
Your free preview is waiting for you! Simply enter your email below.
No Thanks!
close-link

3 hours in 3 minutes
IMAGINE... 3 hours of interview content with the industry's biggest thinkers, distilled down to 3 minutes of highlights and action steps... right in your inbox each week!

SUBSCRIBE HERE
You can unsubscribe anytime.
close-link
Click Me